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What is Radon ?

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. It comes from the decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. Radon gas is colorless, odorless, and without taste.

You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home.  See Massachusetts Radon.

Radon is estimated to cause many thousands of deaths each year. That's because when you breathe air containing radon, you can get lung cancer. In fact, the Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today.

Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

The presence of radon in a home cannot be detected by human senses. The only way to know if your home contains radon gas is to test.

The EPA recommends  that homes with high Radon concentration above 4 pCi/l be mitigated. There are many straight-forward reduction techniques that will work in almost any home.